Latest News: ”I believe the summit will provide…an ideal platform to discuss how multi-sectors can work together in partnership to solve the Humanitarian and Logistical problems in Africa….The Department wishes to appreciate your organisations gesture and look forward to an engaging summit that will enable us to build strong partnerships…” Mr Owiti Director for Communications in the Ministry of Information & Communication

Logistics Complicate Food Aid

The logistics of transporting aid across Africa has proved to be a major issue and very costly to move goods. The continent has only a few broken-down railways. It has nothing resembling a transcontinental motorway.
A study by America’s trade department found that it cost more to ship a ton of wheat from Mombasa in Kenya to Kampala in Uganda than it did to ship it from Chicago to Mombasa.
Somalia, as an example has seen a stream of shipments by air, road, and sea. As the famine in Somalia has worsened, so aid deliveries have increased.
In total, UNICEF Somalia transported 2,000 metric tons of aid into Somalia during the month of July. With its supply division based in Copenhagen, supplying aid has proved to be a major logistical issue.
Whilst airlifts are the most expensive option, shipping has proved to be the cheapest, and can hold most cargo. Chartered flights are being reserved primarily for emergency supplies designed to save severely malnourished children immediately.
Most of the aid destined for Somalia enters Kenya through airports in Nairobi or the port city of Mombasa.
At the end of July and the beginning of August, the World Food Program airlifted 82 tons of specialized supplementary food into the Somali capital.  The food is earmarked to feed 28,000 malnourished children for one month.
The food originally came from France and was subsequently flown into Mogadishu on six flights.
Initially the food was transported on large planes from France, planes too large to get it into Mogadishu because of the facilities in the airport so was taken to Nairobi. The food is then re-packaged in Nairobi, in order to allow it to fit onto smaller planes which can then land in Mogadishu

The logistics of transporting aid across Africa has proved to be a major issue and very costly to move goods. The continent has only a few broken-down railways. It has nothing resembling a transcontinental motorway.
A study by America’s trade department found that it cost more to ship a ton of wheat from Mombasa in Kenya to Kampala in Uganda than it did to ship it from Chicago to Mombasa.

Somalia, as an example has seen a stream of shipments by air, road, and sea. As the famine in Somalia has worsened, so aid deliveries have increased.

In total, UNICEF Somalia transported 2,000 metric tons of aid into Somalia during the month of July. With its supply division based in Copenhagen, supplying aid has proved to be a major logistical issue.Whilst airlifts are the most expensive option, shipping has proved to be the cheapest, and can hold most cargo. Chartered flights are being reserved primarily for emergency supplies designed to save severely malnourished children immediately.

Most of the aid destined for Somalia enters Kenya through airports in Nairobi or the port city of Mombasa.

At the end of July and the beginning of August, the World Food Program airlifted 82 tons of specialized supplementary food into the Somali capital.  The food is earmarked to feed 28,000 malnourished children for one month.

The food originally came from France and was subsequently flown into Mogadishu on six flights.Initially the food was transported on large planes from France, planes too large to get it into Mogadishu because of the facilities in the airport so was taken to Nairobi. The food is then re-packaged in Nairobi, in order to allow it to fit onto smaller planes which can then land in Mogadishu